Cooking with Pressman’s Original Australian Apple Cider

A perfectly balanced and refreshing drink for any occasion, the clean, crisp taste of Pressman’s Original All Australian Apple Cider makes for an excellent food pairing. With fresh apple notes and just a hint of sweetness, it complements a wide variety of foods, especially those difficult-to-match dishes where wine just doesn’t seem to work.

Cooking with cider can enhance the pairing even further, lending a smooth and unusual finish to both savoury and sweet recipes.

This pork shoulder dish is our ultimate showcase of cider in cooking. Deeply savoury and warming, with lingering sweetness and a burst of fresh apple flavour, it takes minimal effort and puts a sophisticated and delicious spin on the traditional roast. It’s the perfect match for a chilled bottle of Pressman’s.

Pressman’s Cider-Roasted Pork Shoulder with Apples

Serves 8

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Total cooking time: 3 hours

This recipe can be doubled or tripled to serve more people. If increasing the quantities, cook all the meat together in one pan, and the apples in a separate dish with some of the pan juices from the meat spooned over before roasting.

Ingredients:

1 x 2kg boned pork shoulder, skin on

1 x 330ml bottle Pressman’s Original All Australian Apple Cider

500ml (2 cups) chicken stock

2tbs brown sugar

8 garlic cloves, peeled and bruised

8 red eating apples

1 bunch fresh sage leaves

3tbs creme fraiche

Crispy fried sage leaves (optional), mashed potato and steamed green beans to serve

Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 160℃. Score the pork skin all over and rub it with a generous sprinkle of salt. Tie the meat with twine to hold its shape while roasting, and put into a large roasting pan (it needs to be large enough to hold the apples later).
  2. Mix the cider, stock and sugar together, then carefully pour into the pan around pork, avoiding the skin. Scatter the garlic into the pan, then place in oven for two hours.
  3. While the pork cooks, prepare the apples by scoring a line around the middle of each one with a sharp knife, just cutting through the skin. When the two hours is up, add the sage and apples to the pan, tucking the sage down into the cooking liquid.
  4. Roast for a further 45 minutes to an hour, until the meat is very soft and pulls away easily when tested with a fork.
  5. Remove the apples from the dish and set aside to a warm place. Scoop out the sage and garlic and discard, and remove the pork. Pour the juices into a saucepan, then return the pork to the pan and increase oven heat to 230℃. Roast the pork until the skin crackles, approximately 15 minutes, then remove from oven and rest for 15 minutes.
  6. While the meat rests, simmer the pan juices until reduced by about half, then remove from heat and whisk through the creme fraiche. Season to taste. Serve the meat with roasted apples, mash and green beans, with the reduced sauce, shards of crackling and fried sage leaves to finish.

By Emily Rhodes

Top 5 Foodie Trends for 2017

Dining Concept Hospitality Organic Food Harvest

Today’s food lovers are discerning and spoilt for choice, making it essential for businesses in the food industry to stay on trend.  At Coca-Cola Amatil, we know time is precious, so to make sure your menu offers what customers are looking for, we’ve done the searching for you.  

Millennials are key

If you want to know what’s driving the current trends, you can look squarely at the millennial population.  Their ethnic diversity and connection with wellbeing and global cuisines is having a big impact on food choices.

While tasty food will always be in vogue, trends move quickly and to remain competitive, you need your finger on the pulse….or do we mean dulse?

According to industry experts, these are the key foodie trends to embrace for this year.

Hospitality food trends 2017 restaurants cafes eatery

 

  1.  Sea vegetables

A Forbes article shows that Pinterest found a massive 336 per cent increase last year in searches involving the word “veggies” relating to comfort food.   As people eat less meat, vegetables are being moved to the centre of the plate. While this makes quite a statement in itself, a standout in this vegetable trend is healthy dulse or seaweed.

There are a variety of seaweeds that chefs are incorporating into their dishes.  With a strong umami flavour (recently recognised as the fifth taste), seaweed is being used as a salt substitute for adding flavour to a dish or for snacking.

  1. Hyper-regional food

No longer satisfied with broad traditional cuisines, consumers are looking for that authentic taste of a particular locality. Customers are drawn to dishes that are exceptional and have a story behind them.  Super specific regional foods and dining—such as South American home cooking, Cuban restaurants and Nordic bakeries—are grabbing people’s attention.

Although the variety of dishes seems limited only by the imagination, authenticity is at the heart of this trend.

  1. Ferment it

It’s all about your gut in 2017. No longer confined to the jar at the back of the fridge, fermented vegetables have reasserted their place at the table and are claimed to be beneficial for maintaining good gut flora.

Innova Market Insights has found that consumers are increasingly making choices about what they eat based on what makes them feel good.  Side serves of Kimchi, Kombucha and Yucatan pickles are not only fashionable but will also look after your customer’s stomachs— literally. Good for them, and good for business.

  1.   Snacks

Sitting down for set meal times is no longer the go.  There is a blurring between meal times that means snacking is increasingly popular and practical for busy people on the go.  

Grazing options on your menu give people who want to snack a choice.  Try share plates or bite size meals to eat in or take out.  Empanadas, tacos or kebabs combine snack size portions with real flavour potential, and as a result, are all topping the trend charts in 2017.

  1.  Breakfast revised

Breakfast is also getting an update. International food and restaurant consultants, Baum and Whiteman, report that not only is breakfast turning into brunch, but the very texture of breakfast is changing and has moved away from softer foods such as eggs and oatmeal.  Plates include anything from crispy chorizo to chimichurri.  Even crunchy fried chicken is getting a look in.

A food service industry research firm called Technomic predicts that customers will expect to see more Asian, African and Middle Eastern ingredients and spices incorporated into breakfast menus.  These heartier options not only make breakfast an all-day meal choice, but are being touted as an excellent hangover cure as well.  

Now you know…

Knowing what your customers are hungry for is as simple as keeping on trend.  Whether it’s menu choices or pickles on the side, make sure your customers are aware that you not only know what is trending in food, but that you can serve it as well.

Lana de Kort

Lana de Kort is a published author and business writer with over 20 years experience working with industry, commerce and community. In 2014 she co-founded a network of over 21 writers across Australia.

Dining in the Age of Social Media

It’s no longer sufficient to put an ad in the paper or write a standard, printed menu to entice and maintain cafe and restaurant clients. Any hospitality business not investing time, money and energy into their social media will simply not survive.

The reality of life is that everyone from primary school age kids to their grandparents are connected to the digital world 24 hours a day. Bombarded with images and ads, it is up to business and brands to cut through the noise and make it possible to develop a relationship with existing and potential customers.

How?

By knowing what your strengths are as a business – do you make really nutritious meals? Do you deliver locally? Is everything organic? Can you cater to gluten-free and paleo customers? Is there a kid’s menu?

Whatever your strengths are, make sure the images, videos, music and stories you share via social media reflect what you’re really good at. Less ads and copying other brands, and more authentic storytelling is what will connect you with your target audience.

In 2019, diners aren’t choosing a breakfast venue based on an ad in the local newspaper or walking past. People are scrolling through their Instagram to see where their friends are going or searching via location and dietary preferences to narrow down their choices. So, here’s what to take note of if you want to stay relevant for digital age diners.

People rely on Instagram instead of a standard menu

Recently, while out at a cafe with a mix of 12 friends and colleagues, I noticed that half of us picked up the standard printed menu, while the other half went straight to their iPhones. Even those of us who had perused the menu then picked up our iPhones to see what the dishes actually looked like via Instagram. What had other people posted about them? Was it a big serve? Was the spinach fresh or pan-fried?

However much effort you’ve put into your print menu, put triple the time and effort into posting appealing photos of your menu items on Instagram and encourage your customers to take photos and share them. Sure, it means you need to put the effort into presenting food that looks good in photos, but that’s the reality of appealing to an audience obsessed with aesthetics.

PR expert in the hospitality industry, Renae Smith from The Atticism says: “A recent study showed that over 60 percent of diners look for photos of the venue’s menu on social media before dining and people are actually 25 percent more likely to trust ‘peer to peer’ venue review (such as on social media) over that of restaurant critics or even the mainstream media.”

By including location tags in photos, you’re more likely to appeal to clientele who live and work in the area. Share your clients’ photos and respond to them to increase engagement on your own social media channels. Thank people for dining with you, congratulate them on their choices, invite them to return.

Reliance on friends’ recommendations and online ratings

People are time-poor and overwhelmed with choices. Nobody wants to risk spending $20 on a meal that doesn’t taste good, in a venue that isn’t welcoming. There’s plenty of evidence that people rely on online review sites such as TripAdvisor and Zomato to assess dining venues based on user ratings. Zomato has over three million active users per month, with over 12,000 Sydney dining venues listed.

There’s no cheats or shortcuts to getting good reviews other than providing exemplary service and encouraging people to review and share their experience. In the event of receiving a bad review, respond with diplomacy and remember your reputation is on the line, so being rude or trying to delete it is likely to make the situation even worse.

When you get positive feedback, or someone posts a great photo of your food or your venue, share it. This encourages more people to engage with you and spreads the good word you’re getting.

Good design and usability of social media and websites is mandatory to succeed

Filling your website with images and videos that are slow to load only frustrates your customers. Keep your website simple and easy to navigate. Think about what people really want to see – a menu, your address and contact details, photos of your food and your opening hours. Make sure links to your Facebook and Instagram are obvious too.

Take photos of your food in natural light, with attention to the background (no dirty tables or smeared glasses) and make sure the food looks as delicious in the photo as you know it tastes.

“With social media, quality is definitely better than quality,” says Smith. “People often ask us how often they post and I simply say, “When you have good content.”  We often post two to three times a week or our clients; if you’ve got a special event, menu release or something exciting, posting high engagement content more frequently is often good to increase activity on your pages.”

By Cat Woods

Bar Boosters: Marketing Strategies for SMBs

All business owners are always looking to boost sales, but with a lack of time under their belt, and ever-evolving marketing tactics, knowing how to do so can become a blur.

Here are some pointers to help you pinpoint a few basic steps towards getting on the right track…

Assess the data through your POS

Whether you’re a retailer or a restaurateur, a good point of sale (POS) marketing strategy can increase sales and drive the bottom line.

Providing in-depth analytics and business insights, POS marketing requires not only the ability to promote a product to customers, but also to make a compelling value proposition to retailers.

But, to get the maximum out of your POS, you can also utilise built-in analytics systems to assess what’s working and what isn’t.

Most POS systems offer analytics with a real-time dashboard so you can consume highly intuitive data around sales, inventory, staff and more. One of the great POS analytics platforms is Lightspeed, whose system covers everything from inventory management to promotional data.

Signage is your signal

In collaboration with POS analytics, it’s important to have great signage in and around your premise. A report from POPAI Australia & New Zealand has a number of key findings after a clinical trial was conducted in the UK and Ireland.

Some of the major details argued that female shoppers who were in-store for 60 or more minutes, bought more from POS displays than male shoppers. Men, on the other, hand were more susceptible to in-store promotions.

Floor graphics and walkaround displays worked best for food and snack purchases, whilst premium displays were the most effective for when people made a trip to food and beverage retailers in a non-premeditated manner.

Taking advantage of the Aussie sports scene

In Australia, there is arguably no bigger sport than AFL.

According to Roy Morgan, 8.4 million Australians tuned in to the 2017 Grand Final, whilst another 1.8 million watched some of the highlights. A 2015 study from Australian universities reveals that 87 percent of alcohol advertising during the day is done during sports broadcasts.

By utilising sports marketing ideas for your bar or restaurant, you can gain the attention of sports-goers who are looking for a hotspot that caters to their interests. Consider including campaigns to support local teams through sponsored evenings, social media promotions, and blog posts on your website. Additionally, running your own tipping competitions, sports-dedicated nights and viewings can help leverage new customers at your door.

If that doesn’t fly, there’s always the favourite marketing ploy of naming drinks after athletes, and hosting replays of classic games during slow periods doesn’t hurt either.

It’s important to know that the only way to publicise your event however, is through the implementation of a bonafide social media strategy.

Develop a social media strategy

A recent study from Maru/Matchbox shows that 69 percent of millennials photograph their food and post it to social media before eating.

In light of this, developing a social media strategy to take advantage of this trend is one of the greatest values to your business.

A five-point strategy is one of the best methods to employ, according to Cambridgeshire Chambers of Commerce. Below is one model to consider:

  • Instagram: Some of the elementary advice is to not post pictures that look like ads, and do not rely on paid Instagram posts. It is important to set up a posting schedule by analysing market data and analytics, whilst employing basic media techniques such as “the rule of thirds” and “regramming”. One of the biggest winners is having a human touch; sharing photos and videos of your followers and their friends is a big win.
  • Facebook: One of the best ways to nail your marketing on this platform is to set up an event and encourage people to share by running a promotion (you do need a reasonable following to achieve this). Other methods of increasing views are to undertake the “three for three” trick. Spend three minutes commenting or liking posts of three other major pages around your area and watch the extra likes come in.
  • Twitter and Snapchat: Twitter is an easy way to grow but requires consistency and a lot of hashtags. On the other side of the coin, Snapchat is a great way to boost visual interaction through using a Geofilter. This tool gives you the ability to set a local tagline or graphic on your business posts that others can access and utilise.

Blogging and SEO: According to HubSpot, blogging is one of the best and most underutilised tools for small businesses. The research notes: “B2B companies that blogged 11 or more times per month had almost three times more traffic than those blogging zero to one times per month.” Blogging is a two-edged sword, as search engines use algorithms based on keywords to serve up relevant content to their users. Input the right words into your blog and you’ll have a higher chance of climbing search results and rankings.

With these tips in mind, consistency is the key for any content creation or content marketing strategy. Like all businesses, creating a successful brand requires time, effort and regular marketing efforts that are reviewed, assessed and updated.

By Timothy Buttery 

Digital Marketing Tips for your Business

Digital Marketing plays a key role in growing businesses of all shapes and sizes, all around the world. In this highly competitive landscape, it has never been more important to keep up to date with the latest changes and advancements in digital marketing.

In this Infographic, we show the importance of digital marketing to businesses today and the digital marketing techniques that marketers find most effective.

Digital_marketing_tips_Business

Tackling the Food Crisis in Australia

By Nicola Heath

The statistics around food waste are startling. Globally, we waste around one third of all food produced, which equates to a staggering 1.3 billion tonnes. At the same time, one in ten people on the planet go hungry.

“In the field with farmers, at processing plants, and in supermarkets, homes and restaurants – right across that food production, processing and consumption supply chain, we’re wasting 30 percent of food. In Australia, it’s 40 percent,” says Professor Andy Lowe, Director of Food Innovation at the University of Adelaide.

According to some estimates, that equates to more than four million tonnes of waste discarded each year, which costs the Australian economy $20 billion per annum.

“Up to 2.2 million tonnes of food is wasted from the commercial and industrial sectors, resulting in significant waste disposal charges and lost product costs to business,” states the National Food Waste Strategy — a 2017 government report that aims to reduce food waste in Australia by 50 per cent by 2030.

The environmental impact of food waste is considerable too. Some food waste gets composted, but most goes to landfill where it breaks down and releases greenhouse gases like methane and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The report states that: “7.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent will be generated from food waste disposed of in 2014–15 over the life of its decay.”

How to reduce food waste

There are a number of practical strategies businesses can adopt to reduce waste in the food services sector.

“Shorten the links in the supply chain to reduce food waste,” says Lowe. Additionally, buy from markets which are close to the source of production or grow your own where possible.

Poor stock management, storage, and handling practices are drivers of food waste in the hospitality sector, as highlighted in the National Food Waste Strategy. Developing limited menus with fewer options is one way to reduce waste, says Assistant Professor in International Studies at the University of Canberra, Bethaney Turner,

“Being aware of what you’ve got, keeping it visible and rotating stock are keys ways in which we can…reduce waste.”

Another option is to reduce serving sizes. Nearly 30 percent of Australians leave food on their plate when they dine out.

“It’s okay to have extravagant meals every now and then but we have to think carefully about not over-ordering or over-buying,” says Turner.

Professor Lowe would like to see the revival of ‘doggie bags’, where diners take home leftovers from a restaurant. “Allowing customers to take home food that the seller considers safe for consumption…[is] a significant step to help reduce food waste,” he says.

Some eateries address health concerns by packaging leftovers with a sticker providing information about food safety guidelines.

Solving a global problem

Food rescue charities such as FoodBank and OzHarvest collect surplus food from businesses and events and redistributes it to people in need.

Reducing food waste is achievable but requires systematic change, says Turner. “We need structures that help us repurpose leftover food. We need good composting structures and organic waste disposal, and we need people to think carefully about how much they’re buying.”

The good news is that individuals, small businesses, and larger organisations can make small changes to their behaviour to be part of the solution to this global problem.

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