Cooking with Pressman’s Original Australian Apple Cider

A perfectly balanced and refreshing drink for any occasion, the clean, crisp taste of Pressman’s Original All Australian Apple Cider makes for an excellent food pairing. With fresh apple notes and just a hint of sweetness, it complements a wide variety of foods, especially those difficult-to-match dishes where wine just doesn’t seem to work.

Cooking with cider can enhance the pairing even further, lending a smooth and unusual finish to both savoury and sweet recipes.

This pork shoulder dish is our ultimate showcase of cider in cooking. Deeply savoury and warming, with lingering sweetness and a burst of fresh apple flavour, it takes minimal effort and puts a sophisticated and delicious spin on the traditional roast. It’s the perfect match for a chilled bottle of Pressman’s.

Pressman’s Cider-Roasted Pork Shoulder with Apples

Serves 8

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Total cooking time: 3 hours

This recipe can be doubled or tripled to serve more people. If increasing the quantities, cook all the meat together in one pan, and the apples in a separate dish with some of the pan juices from the meat spooned over before roasting.

Ingredients:

1 x 2kg boned pork shoulder, skin on

1 x 330ml bottle Pressman’s Original All Australian Apple Cider

500ml (2 cups) chicken stock

2tbs brown sugar

8 garlic cloves, peeled and bruised

8 red eating apples

1 bunch fresh sage leaves

3tbs creme fraiche

Crispy fried sage leaves (optional), mashed potato and steamed green beans to serve

Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 160℃. Score the pork skin all over and rub it with a generous sprinkle of salt. Tie the meat with twine to hold its shape while roasting, and put into a large roasting pan (it needs to be large enough to hold the apples later).
  2. Mix the cider, stock and sugar together, then carefully pour into the pan around pork, avoiding the skin. Scatter the garlic into the pan, then place in oven for two hours.
  3. While the pork cooks, prepare the apples by scoring a line around the middle of each one with a sharp knife, just cutting through the skin. When the two hours is up, add the sage and apples to the pan, tucking the sage down into the cooking liquid.
  4. Roast for a further 45 minutes to an hour, until the meat is very soft and pulls away easily when tested with a fork.
  5. Remove the apples from the dish and set aside to a warm place. Scoop out the sage and garlic and discard, and remove the pork. Pour the juices into a saucepan, then return the pork to the pan and increase oven heat to 230℃. Roast the pork until the skin crackles, approximately 15 minutes, then remove from oven and rest for 15 minutes.
  6. While the meat rests, simmer the pan juices until reduced by about half, then remove from heat and whisk through the creme fraiche. Season to taste. Serve the meat with roasted apples, mash and green beans, with the reduced sauce, shards of crackling and fried sage leaves to finish.

By Emily Rhodes

Top 5 Foodie Trends for 2017

Dining Concept Hospitality Organic Food Harvest

Today’s food lovers are discerning and spoilt for choice, making it essential for businesses in the food industry to stay on trend.  At Coca-Cola Amatil, we know time is precious, so to make sure your menu offers what customers are looking for, we’ve done the searching for you.  

Millennials are key

If you want to know what’s driving the current trends, you can look squarely at the millennial population.  Their ethnic diversity and connection with wellbeing and global cuisines is having a big impact on food choices.

While tasty food will always be in vogue, trends move quickly and to remain competitive, you need your finger on the pulse….or do we mean dulse?

According to industry experts, these are the key foodie trends to embrace for this year.

Hospitality food trends 2017 restaurants cafes eatery

 

  1.  Sea vegetables

A Forbes article shows that Pinterest found a massive 336 per cent increase last year in searches involving the word “veggies” relating to comfort food.   As people eat less meat, vegetables are being moved to the centre of the plate. While this makes quite a statement in itself, a standout in this vegetable trend is healthy dulse or seaweed.

There are a variety of seaweeds that chefs are incorporating into their dishes.  With a strong umami flavour (recently recognised as the fifth taste), seaweed is being used as a salt substitute for adding flavour to a dish or for snacking.

  1. Hyper-regional food

No longer satisfied with broad traditional cuisines, consumers are looking for that authentic taste of a particular locality. Customers are drawn to dishes that are exceptional and have a story behind them.  Super specific regional foods and dining—such as South American home cooking, Cuban restaurants and Nordic bakeries—are grabbing people’s attention.

Although the variety of dishes seems limited only by the imagination, authenticity is at the heart of this trend.

  1. Ferment it

It’s all about your gut in 2017. No longer confined to the jar at the back of the fridge, fermented vegetables have reasserted their place at the table and are claimed to be beneficial for maintaining good gut flora.

Innova Market Insights has found that consumers are increasingly making choices about what they eat based on what makes them feel good.  Side serves of Kimchi, Kombucha and Yucatan pickles are not only fashionable but will also look after your customer’s stomachs— literally. Good for them, and good for business.

  1.   Snacks

Sitting down for set meal times is no longer the go.  There is a blurring between meal times that means snacking is increasingly popular and practical for busy people on the go.  

Grazing options on your menu give people who want to snack a choice.  Try share plates or bite size meals to eat in or take out.  Empanadas, tacos or kebabs combine snack size portions with real flavour potential, and as a result, are all topping the trend charts in 2017.

  1.  Breakfast revised

Breakfast is also getting an update. International food and restaurant consultants, Baum and Whiteman, report that not only is breakfast turning into brunch, but the very texture of breakfast is changing and has moved away from softer foods such as eggs and oatmeal.  Plates include anything from crispy chorizo to chimichurri.  Even crunchy fried chicken is getting a look in.

A food service industry research firm called Technomic predicts that customers will expect to see more Asian, African and Middle Eastern ingredients and spices incorporated into breakfast menus.  These heartier options not only make breakfast an all-day meal choice, but are being touted as an excellent hangover cure as well.  

Now you know…

Knowing what your customers are hungry for is as simple as keeping on trend.  Whether it’s menu choices or pickles on the side, make sure your customers are aware that you not only know what is trending in food, but that you can serve it as well.

Lana de Kort

Lana de Kort is a published author and business writer with over 20 years experience working with industry, commerce and community. In 2014 she co-founded a network of over 21 writers across Australia.

How Hyper-Regional works for Food

Hyper-regional foods are hot right now, and smart food businesses have been quick to get on trend. In regional Victoria, one small town has discovered that going hyper-regional is not only good for business, but also for the town’s economy by attracting local, and tourism dollars.

Taking hyper-regional to town

The historic town of Clunes in Victoria is known for its books.  The only internationally recognised Booktown in Australia, the annual Clunes Booktown Festival has played a key role in boosting the local economy and putting this little village on the map. But it’s the use of local produce and storytelling that has turned a sense of place into a real business asset for the town’s small businesses.

What is hyper-regional food?

Hyper-regional food is just as it sounds: local produce and recipes that are core to the identity of a place. In Georgia in the U.S.—where John Pemberton invented Coca-Cola—the 500-something brands represented under the Coca-Cola umbrella are all icons. In the Australian town of Clunes, its produce is grown from surrounding farms and wineries that are becoming ubiquitous with eating in the small town.

Hyper Regional Foods trends

Fresh food

Surrounded by farms, the cafés and pubs in Clunes have access to the types of fresh produce you’d expect to find in a regional area.  There is the local farmer who has turned butcher to supply locally grown lamb and beef.  The beekeeper—whose beehives are on properties throughout the district—produces honey with flavours unique to each field. There’s even a peanut farmer who makes Clunes’ favourite peanut butter.  However, what is unexpected is the way businesses take advantage of the stories behind the food to create a unique sense of place for customers eating in their establishments.  

It’s in the history

Businesses understand that the hyper-regional trend is about the combination of fresh produce, local history and your ability to tell a tale.

Local winegrower Jane Lesock of Mt. Beckworth Wines has made hyper-regional her business.  Offering locally grown wines from her nearby vineyard provides people with a true taste of Clunes and its surrounding countryside.

“We were one of the first wine producers to take our cellar door into the village,” says Lesock, whose retail outlet recently celebrated 10 years of business.

“People like to know where the grapes are grown and how they are produced, but they also want a story as well.”

Mt. Beckworth Wines makes sure their story is front and centre, naming their collection after family members. Each sale comes with a tale, ensuring customers remember the wine long after the bottle is empty.

Putting the hype in hyper-regional

“Trends come and go,” says Matt O’Kelly, proprietor of O’Hara’s @ Clunes Bakery, known locally for their own custard kringle and speciality chunky beef pies.

“It’s hard for a small business to really create the momentum to take advantage of those trends alone.  But when all the traders feature local food or recipes, it’s easier for us to work together to promote that locally and to tourists.

“In Clunes, the traders do this through our Clunes Tourist Development Association, town websites and media releases.

“Now when people come to our bakery and ask for a pie, they ask for a Clunes pie.”

Trends that work for you

Whether the hyper-regional food choice on your menu is produced or grown locally, or is simply a recipe with a tale, make sure you can leverage off it to drive traffic to your hotel, restaurant or café. Why? Because the most important part of being on trend is making sure that the trend works for you.

About the Author

Lana de Kort is a published author and business writer with over 20 years experience working with industry, commerce and community.  In 2014 she co-founded a network of over 21 writers across Australia.

 

Glass Half Full: Food and Beverage Trends for 2018

Forgive the cliche, but 2018 is a big year for everything food and beverage. Knowing what’s on-trend and what’s being phased out could be the make or break for foodservice brands. As a business owner, getting to know the relevant trends will help you better understand how to implement social media and marketing strategies, which will drive your ROI in the right direction.  

In light of Mintel’s Global Food and Drink Trends Report 2018, and data from The National Restaurant Association 2018’s ‘What’s hot’ press release, Business owners need to gain perspective in the success and failures of global trends, and their relevance to the Australian market.

Australia Food News and Innova Market Insights have continuously help to put Australia’s trends in the spotlight. These interests are divided into three distinct sub-categories:  

1. What’s hot

Mindfulness: The art of bringing your attention to the present moment has hit the Western world in a big way.

Originating from Buddhist philosophies taught by Siddhartha Gautama, mindfulness usually refers to a meditative or pseudo-religious technique, but in this space, consumers are beginning to practice mindfulness through food and drink consumption.

Innova Market Insights reports “…a trend in mindfulness is dominating the early parts of 2018 and will be big for the rest of the year, as consumers begin to take more interest in the holistic process of food and beverage creation and consumption”.

Additionally, the research notes that consumers will want less in 2018: smaller portion sizes, lighter alcohol content and less sweetness — but without the sacrifice to quality and taste. This holistic approach has rapidly picked up past over the last few years, but growth is set to explode over the next 12 months.

Food texture: According to Mintel, food texture and feel is set to be the latest customer craze and should feature heavily in social media marketing strategies.

Businesses focussing on texture should opt for trends like contemporary cuts of meat (shoulder tender, oyster steak, Vegas strip steak, merlot cut); street foods; carb substitutions and ethnic foods.

Healthy choices: More than ever, consumers are more health-driven, opting for smart food and beverage choices to suit their lifestyles.

Unlike previous times, the vacillation of fad dieting is having little effect on consumers who are employing healthy lifestyles.

hands preparing mojito cocktail

2. What’s not hot

All varieties of fast food are also on the decline, not necessarily because of nutritional content, but because consumers are searching for a personalised and meaningful touch to their meals per Australia Food News.

This is consistent with what Future Food defines as sustainability, as “sourcing ingredients from local producers and providers [will] minimise the carbon footprint”.

From what Innova reports, consumers will continue their heightened awareness around fast and processed foods. Australian Food News informs that the British popularised ‘food to go’, a healthy alternative to traditional ‘fast food’, will be on the rise as a result.

With an estimated worth of £16 billion, ‘the food to go’ industry consists of sandwiches, wraps, salads and other healthy alternatives that are pre packaged and sold in convenience stores. In recent years, this industry has seen success in Australia but expect more of it to emerge.

Beverage bonanza

In the beverage industry, consumers are constantly looking for vendors and companies to ‘push the boundaries’ on pairings, appearances and taste sensations.

House-made artisan soft drinks are going to be big on the list. Although smaller chains will look to dominate this space, larger chains are going to engage in this arena by releasing more niche products that reflect the trends.

Classic and crowd favourite beverages have now become timeless. With that in mind, they had to start somewhere, and there is a market this year to introduce the next “big thing.”

Turning to alcohol, consumers have culinary cocktails high on their radars as they are wanting an experience with their beverages akin to 2017’s molecular gastronomy.

Gourmet lemonade and onsite barrel-aged drinks round out the list of predicted winners in 2018. This rapid expansion in pure varieties of food and drink in 2018’s retail channels will fuel the opportunity for recommendations, promotions, and product innovations based on actual consumer behaviour patterns.

Many big brands are already latching onto these trends; the question remains, will yours?

By Timothy Buttery

Break Through the Red Tape

The first rule of food production and service is safety.

It is an issue that is treated seriously and severely in Australia, with recalls, fines and even heavier penalties handed out when the standards are breached.

This can be a lot to take on board for businesses, with governing bodies existing at all three tiers of government.

This article aims to cut through the red tape so you can ensure you are properly protected.

Food safety standards in Australia

Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) is the governing body for food and beverage safety guidelines in our country.

FSANZ covers food safety programs, practices and general requirements, premises and equipment, and programs for food service to vulnerable persons.

The guidelines for the ‘Food Safety Practices and General Requirements’ and ‘Food Premises and Equipment’ sections are mandatory for all food businesses. These guidelines can all be read in the Safe Food Australia document, which is currently under review.

It is also important to note that charity and community groups, temporary events and home-based businesses are exempt from some of these guidelines, so it’s important for them to check with their local enforcement agency before serving customers.

But while this is the blanket body across the nation, it is important to note that states and territories have their own governing bodies and guidelines as well.

Keep up to date what with the legalities in running a hospitality business

 

How it varies from state to state

ACT

Canberra is subject to the federal FSANZ guidelines.

New South Wales

There are two acts of legislation to consider here, the Food Act 2003 (NSW) and Food Regulation 2015.

The Food Act 2003 (NSW) enforces FSANZ guidelines and then designs, and monitors food safety schemes under the Food Regulation 2015 for the higher risk industries.

Northern Territory

Like the ACT, the NT operates under FSANZ guidelines.

Queensland

Safe Food Queensland manages operational aspects, and it is important to familiarise yourself with the Food Act 2006, the Food Regulation 2006, the Food Production (Safety) Act 2000 and the Food Production (Safety) Regulation 2014. Also check with local governments, which may have their own food safety regulations.

South Australia

The Food Safety and Nutrition Branch (FSNB) of South Australia Health is the governing body for guidelines here. It operates under two acts of legislation: the Food Act 2001 (SA) and the Food Regulations 2002, as well as FSANZ. FSNB works in tandem with other government agencies and local governments to ensure maximum safety.

Tasmania

The guidelines on the Apple Isle are perhaps the most stringent in the country, with a clear mandate to not only ensure safety but protect the state’s reputation. A raft of legislation needs to be considered here, including; The Primary Produce Safety Act 2011, Primary Produce Safety (Egg) Regulations 2014, and Primary Produce Safety (Meat and Poultry) Regulations 2014. Guidelines for dairy, seafood, and seed sprouts also need to be recognised.

Victoria

The Food Act 1984 provides the regulatory framework in Victoria. Health Victoria works with Federal and local governments to ensure consistency across the board.

Western Australia

Out west, the State Government boasts that they have the most comprehensive food safety legislation in the country, under the Food Act 2008. It covers 19 different issues for consumers and many, many topics for businesses covered under seven banners. Heavy reading, but as close to watertight as you can get in this country.

Where businesses have fallen afoul of the guidelines

The legislated rules for food safety are more than just guidelines—they carry heavy penalties if not followed.

Brisbane restaurant West End Garden was slugged with a $37,500 fine in August last year for multiple breaches.

Produce is also vulnerable, with 80 cases of salmonella in 2016 linked to the consumption of rockmelons.

There were also fears of a national shortage of garlic bread early this year after a recall of 11 of George Weston Foods products was issued.

In addition to these instances, bread rolls and mango drinks have also been recalled from supermarket shelves in recent years.

FSANZ lists the problems that can cause contamination as microbial contamination, labeling errors, foreign matter, chemical or other contaminants, undeclared allergens, biotoxins and other faults.

It definitely pays to be vigilant about food safety legislation.

About the Author

Josh Alston is a journalist, editor and copywriter who has worked for several daily, community and regional newspapers across the Queensland seaboard for 12 years. In this time he has covered news, sport and community issues and has been published in major daily newspapers and nationally online for breaking news. Josh presently works as a freelance reporter writing for clients including the Victorian Government, AGL Energy and a host of others.

 

How Far Will the Fast-Casual Concept Influence Hospitality?

Fast but authentic is a trend that’s taken hold in the hospitality industry. Fast-casual dining that combines quality and convenience has changed the experiences being offered in restaurants, cafes, hotels and retail stores. But is the trend sustainable, and how will it evolve?

The incredible growth of fast-casual

Modern diners want food that’s prepared to order, using quality ingredients, yet is still quick and easy. This desire has driven incredible growth in the dining trend known as fast-casual.

Fast-casual chain restaurants are leading growth in the global foodservice industry. Market Insight company Technomic’s annual Top 250 Fast-Casual Chain Restaurant Report in 2016 showed cumulative sales for the top 250 fast-casual chains were up 11.6 per cent.

Chain restaurants are not the only place the trend is having an impact. Many hotels recognise that traditional full-service restaurants don’t meet expectations of modern travellers, and are increasing revenues by switching to a more relaxed dining experience on property.

Fast-casual requires an investment in quality products and special attention to facets such as fitout and sustainability, but it also generates a higher spend per customer (than fast food) and more chances to provide unique dining experiences that offer enhanced value.

Lifestyle and technology changes drive dining choices

Disruptors like Airbnb and Uber have changed consumer perceptions of what constitutes a service, while apps, consumer rating sites and aggregators have shifted the balance of power to customers in terms of influence and choice.

Technology has fostered a belief that quality and value can be obtained quickly and with minimal cost, effort or inconvenience. Fast-casual is about having your cake and eating it too: fast food without the grease; regular fine dining without the expense; luxury and consumerism without the environmental/social downsides.

The fast-casual trend also represents a desire for a more engaged and authentic experience on the part of diners. Traditional dining concepts like draping napkins on people’s laps may be seen as old-fashioned, but in other ways, diners crave a return to tradition.

Rustic or wholesome meals, simple ingredient lists, and comfortable settings that encourage conversation feel more honest to a consumer that is wary of marketing promises—and can build a sense of trust that is more powerful than other indicators of value (such as price).

Fast_Food_Concept

 

Casual does not mean apathetic

Fast-casual diners want delicious, on-demand food options but their purchasing decisions are driven by deeply held concerns.

According to Nielsen’s Global Ingredient and Out-of-Home Dining Trends Report, based on responses from more than 30,000 consumers across 63 countries, an increased focus on health and wellness is strongly affecting eating choices.

Food preferences and sensitivities have changed food choices, but technology has also created more informed consumers who are more interested in using food to control their health.

The report states: “Two-thirds of global respondents (68 per cent) strongly or somewhat agree they’re willing to pay more for foods and drinks that don’t contain undesirable ingredients.”

People want food that is healthful, natural, organic and sustainably sourced; but even more so, they want to avoid artificial flavours and colours, hormones and chemicals.

Modern diners are also more conscious of factors including supply chain management, workers rights and food waste. The Global Food and Drink Trends 2017 report by market research company Mintel reveals that many people now turn down special offers to avoid wasting food.

Is the influence of fast-casual going to last?

Can the fast-casual concept continue to effectively deliver both convenience and quality at scale? Will consumers continue to pay more for pared back service?

Contemporary diners are tech-savvy, time-poor, looking for value and concerned about how their purchasing decision defines them and their place in the world.

Fast-casual dining has evolved as a direct result of these concerns, which show no signs of disappearing.

There are enormous, emerging opportunities to customise fast-casual dining experiences. Nielsen’s research shows almost a third of people have restrictive diets, yet fewer than half (45 per cent) say their needs are being fully met by current food and beverage offerings.

How can hospitality best leverage fast casual?

Leveraging the fast-casual concept firstly means meeting people’s needs quickly, with minimal friction—by focusing on efficient processes, technologies and well-trained staff.

But this must be paired with an emphasis on quality and authenticity that responds to customer concerns about health and sustainability, which will also open up greater opportunities to build loyalty over time.

People will continue to rely on hospitality businesses to support their busy lifestyles and enable them to make healthy choices even as they indulge—and they will pay for that privilege if the offering represents true value.

About the Author

Jody McDonald is a creative communicator who works with businesses to plan and develop compelling content and websites, and writes about the digital economy, marketing trends and the future of work.

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