Category Archives: Business Insights

Digital Marketing Tips for your Business

Digital Marketing plays a key role in growing businesses of all shapes and sizes, all around the world. In this highly competitive landscape, it has never been more important to keep up to date with the latest changes and advancements in digital marketing.

In this Infographic, we show the importance of digital marketing to businesses today and the digital marketing techniques that marketers find most effective.

Digital_marketing_tips_Business

How Digital Platforms Influence Dining

Today’s busy customer expects restaurant-quality meals ordered in a few clicks on their phone and delivered to their door. Tall order, anyone?

Business owner Kate Toon says having food delivered to her door (or hotel) is a huge bonus. “I travel a lot and UberEats gives me a chance to try something new. As a vegetarian, there are so many options on the website.”

Recent research by finder.com.au found Australians spend $2.6 billion annually on having food delivered through companies like Menulog, UberEats, Deliveroo and Foodora. Aussies clearly love the convenience and choice offered by these companies. It’s also commonplace to look up a restaurant and read reviews before choosing to eat there.

So, how do these digital platforms affect restaurant owners?


Read Google and TripAdvisor reviews


Many people look up restaurants on TripAdvisor or read Google reviews before making a reservation. Instagram is also a big influencer for millennials. Research shows one in three millennials avoid eating at restaurants that are not active on Instagram.

According to ReviewTrackers, 63 percent of people check Google reviews before visiting a business while 94 percent of customers avoid a company if they’ve read negative reviews.

Make sure you keep an eye on your listings and regularly search for any unhappy customers who may be sharing negative experiences, relating to your business, online. Quickly addressing these reviews can turn an unhappy customer into a raving fan. By proactively acknowledging their complaint online and replying reflects positively on your business.

Tip: If social media overwhelms you, take it slow. Either hire one of your tech-savvy employees to #hashtag your social content, or learn how to do it yourself. Every 28 seconds, someone tags an Australian hotel, restaurant, or bar on Instagram. Don’t miss valuable social media traffic that can turn into actual customers.


Delivering food to customer’s door


Food delivery platforms like UberEats, Menulog and others have transformed the whole dining experience for customers in Australia. Even hatted restaurants like Sake allow customers to order through UberEats.

According to Morgan Stanley, more people will order takeaway food online by 2025 and the industry will be worth $4.2 billion. Busy customers are demanding more convenience and high food quality, as working hours become longer.

In Australia, UberEats, Menulog and other delivery companies have a list of restaurants on their websites. Customers order their meals through an app or the website.  The restaurant receives the order, makes the food and packs it ready for delivery. UberEats’ drivers take the food to the customer’s home or office while Menulog has restaurants make the deliveries themselves.


Get new customers


For Nerissa, owner of Lankan Tucker in Brunswick West, UberEats has brought more customers to their business since they signed up less than a year ago. “Despite the large commission (35 percent) charged by UberEats, we’ve managed to reach a lot more people who may not have found us otherwise,” she says.

“We’ve had a few issues with food going missing from bags or food going cold, which are beyond our control. Overall, the biggest benefit of being on UberEats has been more customers,” says Nerissa.

Running a restaurant is tough. Keeping up to date with what your customers want, and continuously looking for ways to increase sales and profits will keep you in business.

Digital platforms might be a way to reach more customers. But you also need to prepare for drivers turning up late, dropping off multiple orders affecting food temperature, high commissions affecting profit margins and kitchen staff stretched during busy times.

Like any other method, this approach needs careful analysis, monitoring and rapid problem solving to keep on top of results.

By Rashida Tayabali

Break Through the Red Tape

The first rule of food production and service is safety.

It is an issue that is treated seriously and severely in Australia, with recalls, fines and even heavier penalties handed out when the standards are breached.

This can be a lot to take on board for businesses, with governing bodies existing at all three tiers of government.

This article aims to cut through the red tape so you can ensure you are properly protected.

Food safety standards in Australia

Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) is the governing body for food and beverage safety guidelines in our country.

FSANZ covers food safety programs, practices and general requirements, premises and equipment, and programs for food service to vulnerable persons.

The guidelines for the ‘Food Safety Practices and General Requirements’ and ‘Food Premises and Equipment’ sections are mandatory for all food businesses. These guidelines can all be read in the Safe Food Australia document, which is currently under review.

It is also important to note that charity and community groups, temporary events and home-based businesses are exempt from some of these guidelines, so it’s important for them to check with their local enforcement agency before serving customers.

But while this is the blanket body across the nation, it is important to note that states and territories have their own governing bodies and guidelines as well.

Keep up to date what with the legalities in running a hospitality business

 

How it varies from state to state

ACT

Canberra is subject to the federal FSANZ guidelines.

New South Wales

There are two acts of legislation to consider here, the Food Act 2003 (NSW) and Food Regulation 2015.

The Food Act 2003 (NSW) enforces FSANZ guidelines and then designs, and monitors food safety schemes under the Food Regulation 2015 for the higher risk industries.

Northern Territory

Like the ACT, the NT operates under FSANZ guidelines.

Queensland

Safe Food Queensland manages operational aspects, and it is important to familiarise yourself with the Food Act 2006, the Food Regulation 2006, the Food Production (Safety) Act 2000 and the Food Production (Safety) Regulation 2014. Also check with local governments, which may have their own food safety regulations.

South Australia

The Food Safety and Nutrition Branch (FSNB) of South Australia Health is the governing body for guidelines here. It operates under two acts of legislation: the Food Act 2001 (SA) and the Food Regulations 2002, as well as FSANZ. FSNB works in tandem with other government agencies and local governments to ensure maximum safety.

Tasmania

The guidelines on the Apple Isle are perhaps the most stringent in the country, with a clear mandate to not only ensure safety but protect the state’s reputation. A raft of legislation needs to be considered here, including; The Primary Produce Safety Act 2011, Primary Produce Safety (Egg) Regulations 2014, and Primary Produce Safety (Meat and Poultry) Regulations 2014. Guidelines for dairy, seafood, and seed sprouts also need to be recognised.

Victoria

The Food Act 1984 provides the regulatory framework in Victoria. Health Victoria works with Federal and local governments to ensure consistency across the board.

Western Australia

Out west, the State Government boasts that they have the most comprehensive food safety legislation in the country, under the Food Act 2008. It covers 19 different issues for consumers and many, many topics for businesses covered under seven banners. Heavy reading, but as close to watertight as you can get in this country.

Where businesses have fallen afoul of the guidelines

The legislated rules for food safety are more than just guidelines—they carry heavy penalties if not followed.

Brisbane restaurant West End Garden was slugged with a $37,500 fine in August last year for multiple breaches.

Produce is also vulnerable, with 80 cases of salmonella in 2016 linked to the consumption of rockmelons.

There were also fears of a national shortage of garlic bread early this year after a recall of 11 of George Weston Foods products was issued.

In addition to these instances, bread rolls and mango drinks have also been recalled from supermarket shelves in recent years.

FSANZ lists the problems that can cause contamination as microbial contamination, labeling errors, foreign matter, chemical or other contaminants, undeclared allergens, biotoxins and other faults.

It definitely pays to be vigilant about food safety legislation.

About the Author

Josh Alston is a journalist, editor and copywriter who has worked for several daily, community and regional newspapers across the Queensland seaboard for 12 years. In this time he has covered news, sport and community issues and has been published in major daily newspapers and nationally online for breaking news. Josh presently works as a freelance reporter writing for clients including the Victorian Government, AGL Energy and a host of others.

 

The Future of Vending Machines

There is a digital revolution coming to the world of vending machines, with the Internet of Things, artificial intelligence and customer engagement at the forefront.

The first vending machines were rolled out in London back in 1883, where customers could slot in their coins to receive a postcard. In the many, many years that followed not much has changed…until now.

Today’s world has customers connected like never before, with powerful processors in their mobile phones, their tablet computers and even their wrist watches.

Cash is no longer king—technology is everything. So how are vending machines moving with the times to not only remain viable, but create a better way to connect and engage companies with potential clients in the future?

Vending machine apps powered by artificial intelligence

The latest Coca-Cola Amatil vending machines to be rolled out in Australia, New Zealand and the United States want to get to know their customers.

And through innovative, artificial intelligence-driven programs, these machines will break new ground by establishing a link with the average consumer’s smartphone, and getting to know their spending habits.

Through an innovative new app, users will now be able to order up to two drinks (one for them, one for their mate) remotely and then collect them from the vending machine at a later time.

This paves the way for two-way communication, with the machines able to collect information about behaviours and personalities—and use that to deliver marketing promotions at a later date.

It will also provide unique experiences depending on where the machine is located. Machines on university grounds may employ colourful, attractive music and video displays, for example, where machines on hospital grounds are likely to be kept more sedate.

It is AI in an embryonic format, but one Coca-Cola hopes to expand on to “create intelligence experiences”, global director of digital innovation Greg Chambers said.

“My goal is to push boundaries and push the brand forward,” he said. “AI is the foundation for everything we do.”

Personalised in-store advertising

The rise of technology means vending machines now include touch screens, which can display promotions, videos, games and TV commercials. This allows for greater connectivity and engagement with the consumer.

Now, Coca-Cola Amatil is aiming for the next evolution of advertising on the retail floor, through a partnership with Google that will deliver content that is custom made for each consumer.

Trials have already begun in an American shopping centre where in-store advertising screens connect to the smartphone of people walking by, and then screens targeted ads based on spending habits and preferences.

The system works as a fusion of DoubleClick’s preference and tracking data combined with Google’s Beacon Platform, and the early trials have been encouraging.

Should these trials continue to track along positively, it is expected they could be rolled out in other outlets like movie theatres and various retail venues.

Self-filling vending machines

Soft drink companies possess some of the largest truck fleets in the world to maintain stock levels, but still, vending machines can run out of product when consumers want them most.

This is not an issue in the modern world.

The new wave of vending machines are connected to the internet, allowing owners to communicate directly with Coca-Cola Amatil. Sales are automatically recorded as a product’s count gets low, with all data streamed dynamically.

This technology is not limited to just filling the fridge, either. Service issues can be automatically reported and technicians ordered, saving time and money.

Combating the death of cash

The decline of physical cash is no longer theoretical. Citibank has recently ceased cash-handling services at six branches in Australia. ANZ has opened a cashless sales-only branch in Bondi, and even their own CEO Fred Ohlsson has admitted to going cashless. Bad news for buskers and vending machines, right? Wrong.

The decline of cash has come largely due to the rise of ‘tap-and-go’ technology installed in bank cards, allowing consumers to tap for even the smallest of purchases.

And vending machines, using technology like Coca-Cola Swipe—which allows for cashless transactions—are able to distribute products quickly and safely without the need for loose change.

Globally, vending machines are taking this a step further by accommodating mobile wallet technologies. For example, Apple Pay for iPhone and Google Wallet for Android are becoming more and more mainstream, with already more than 100,000 vending machines in the US accepting iPhone-driven payments.

“Younger generations don’t carry cash, so we’re employing ways to meet their needs,” said Derek Myers, Coca-Cola Refreshments director of vending strategy. “By 2020, mobile is going to be a mainstream way of making payment transactions.”

These are just some of the innovations moving forward, but with the faster 5G mobile network coming soon to Australia, the increased development of AI and the spread of The Internet of Things, Coca-Cola Amatil will continue to work on new solutions for vending machines across the board.

 

Tools to Help Your Business get Organised Every Day

Now more than ever, running a business is a 24/7 commitment. On any given day, you have staff to manage, meetings to schedule, marketing objectives to meet and customers to keep happy.

There are plenty of apps and tools on the market to help you manage, schedule, appoint tasks and arrive on time. These include “email slayers”, spending trackers, flight planners and even an app to help find a font you like. Here are 10 little-to-no-cost wonders that will help you run your business without a hitch.

IFTT (If This, Then That): IFTT is a series of applets that perform a specific task. These applets connect features across multiple platforms to do things like get a notification if it’s going to rain tomorrow, or automatically save new Gmail attachments to your Google Drive.

Cost: Free

TinyScan: This handy app turns your phone into a pocket scanner that can scan in documents, receipts, or even multiple files in seconds. TinyScan uses your smartphone camera to take a photo of any A4 document (in colour or black and white), all while on the go. It stores your virtual copy ready to share via email or a cloud-based platform.

Cost: Free limited use version. Full version: A$7.99 or US$5.99.

Hopper: Business travel can sometimes come up last-minute, but if you know the dates of when you want to fly, and your destination, Hopper alerts you on when to book to get the cheapest airfares. Add multiple trips to your “watchlist” and enable notifications to get alerts that let you know the best time to buy. Once you’re ready to purchase, Hopper lets you book directly from the app.

Cost: Free.

Unroll me: If you’ve subscribed to work-related email newsletters (and maybe some personal ones as well), it’s probably causing your inbox to burst at the seams. Rather than trying to wade through your inbox and unsubscribe one by one manually, Unroll.me sends you a once-daily summary of all of them and lets you quickly unsubscribe to the ones you no longer want.

Cost: Free.

What The Font: If you’ve seen a font on a logo you like the look of, this tool can help. Simply upload the logo, check the letter mapping and you’ll be given a list of possible font matches.

Cost: Free. Payment required for the font (should you wish to purchase).

online_tools_social_media_presence

 

Down For Everyone or Just Me: This handy tool allows you to enter a website URL to figure out if it’s down for everyone, or if it’s a problem on your end. Enter the URL in the search box, click the link, and away you go.

Cost: Free.

Grammarly: As we’re communicating more and more via email, this handy tool skims as you type, highlighting any spelling mistakes or grammatical errors and suggestions on how to correct them.

Cost: Free. Premium tier starts at A$39.30 or US$29.95 per month.

Postfity: When it’s all hands on deck in your business, it’s hard to schedule time to update your online social presence as well. This is where Postify can help. It lets you update Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google Plus, connecting up to five unique accounts. You can send immediately, as well as schedule updates.

Cost: Free. Basic tier pricing starts at $A6.55 or US$5 per month.

MyWeeklyBudget: With a streamlined and simple-to-use interface for tracking your spending, this app allows you to enter the item and amount after each purchase. It’s a good alternative to a spreadsheet or logging into an app once a month to see if you’ve stuck to your budget.

Cost: A$1.49 or US 99c.

BONUS: As our digital lives become increasingly intertwined with our physical ones, developers have been looking for ways for family members to have access to our digital files after we die. Dead Man’s Switch is a service that lets you leave some important info (usernames, passwords, etc) for your loved ones. It lets you craft a secure email to be sent out if you don’t respond to the service’s periodic emails checking in with you.

Cost: Free. Premium tier: A$26.25 or US$20/lifetime.

Now with these business helpers, you’ve got a few ways to make your worklife a little easier to navigate.

Related Article:

Marketing Your Business in the Digital Age

About the Author

Angela Allan is a journalist, copywriter, social media manager, and content strategist. A former music writer for Rolling Stone, FHM and Australian Penthouse, Angela started her own online publication, Soot Magazine, in 2012. She went on to become managing editor of Australia’s first brand-led newsroom at CHE Proximity. In 2016, she led the digital video campaign for Crown-owned brand, San Antone by Bludso’s BBQ. Currently, she is the digital copywriter for Melbourne startup Foxley

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