Tag Archives: management

Bar Boosters: Marketing Strategies for SMBs

All business owners are always looking to boost sales, but with a lack of time under their belt, and ever-evolving marketing tactics, knowing how to do so can become a blur.

Here are some pointers to help you pinpoint a few basic steps towards getting on the right track…

Assess the data through your POS

Whether you’re a retailer or a restaurateur, a good point of sale (POS) marketing strategy can increase sales and drive the bottom line.

Providing in-depth analytics and business insights, POS marketing requires not only the ability to promote a product to customers, but also to make a compelling value proposition to retailers.

But, to get the maximum out of your POS, you can also utilise built-in analytics systems to assess what’s working and what isn’t.

Most POS systems offer analytics with a real-time dashboard so you can consume highly intuitive data around sales, inventory, staff and more. One of the great POS analytics platforms is Lightspeed, whose system covers everything from inventory management to promotional data.

Signage is your signal

In collaboration with POS analytics, it’s important to have great signage in and around your premise. A report from POPAI Australia & New Zealand has a number of key findings after a clinical trial was conducted in the UK and Ireland.

Some of the major details argued that female shoppers who were in-store for 60 or more minutes, bought more from POS displays than male shoppers. Men, on the other, hand were more susceptible to in-store promotions.

Floor graphics and walkaround displays worked best for food and snack purchases, whilst premium displays were the most effective for when people made a trip to food and beverage retailers in a non-premeditated manner.

Taking advantage of the Aussie sports scene

In Australia, there is arguably no bigger sport than AFL.

According to Roy Morgan, 8.4 million Australians tuned in to the 2017 Grand Final, whilst another 1.8 million watched some of the highlights. A 2015 study from Australian universities reveals that 87 percent of alcohol advertising during the day is done during sports broadcasts.

By utilising sports marketing ideas for your bar or restaurant, you can gain the attention of sports-goers who are looking for a hotspot that caters to their interests. Consider including campaigns to support local teams through sponsored evenings, social media promotions, and blog posts on your website. Additionally, running your own tipping competitions, sports-dedicated nights and viewings can help leverage new customers at your door.

If that doesn’t fly, there’s always the favourite marketing ploy of naming drinks after athletes, and hosting replays of classic games during slow periods doesn’t hurt either.

It’s important to know that the only way to publicise your event however, is through the implementation of a bonafide social media strategy.

Develop a social media strategy

A recent study from Maru/Matchbox shows that 69 percent of millennials photograph their food and post it to social media before eating.

In light of this, developing a social media strategy to take advantage of this trend is one of the greatest values to your business.

A five-point strategy is one of the best methods to employ, according to Cambridgeshire Chambers of Commerce. Below is one model to consider:

  • Instagram: Some of the elementary advice is to not post pictures that look like ads, and do not rely on paid Instagram posts. It is important to set up a posting schedule by analysing market data and analytics, whilst employing basic media techniques such as “the rule of thirds” and “regramming”. One of the biggest winners is having a human touch; sharing photos and videos of your followers and their friends is a big win.
  • Facebook: One of the best ways to nail your marketing on this platform is to set up an event and encourage people to share by running a promotion (you do need a reasonable following to achieve this). Other methods of increasing views are to undertake the “three for three” trick. Spend three minutes commenting or liking posts of three other major pages around your area and watch the extra likes come in.
  • Twitter and Snapchat: Twitter is an easy way to grow but requires consistency and a lot of hashtags. On the other side of the coin, Snapchat is a great way to boost visual interaction through using a Geofilter. This tool gives you the ability to set a local tagline or graphic on your business posts that others can access and utilise.

Blogging and SEO: According to HubSpot, blogging is one of the best and most underutilised tools for small businesses. The research notes: “B2B companies that blogged 11 or more times per month had almost three times more traffic than those blogging zero to one times per month.” Blogging is a two-edged sword, as search engines use algorithms based on keywords to serve up relevant content to their users. Input the right words into your blog and you’ll have a higher chance of climbing search results and rankings.

With these tips in mind, consistency is the key for any content creation or content marketing strategy. Like all businesses, creating a successful brand requires time, effort and regular marketing efforts that are reviewed, assessed and updated.

By Timothy Buttery 

Tackling the Food Crisis in Australia

By Nicola Heath

The statistics around food waste are startling. Globally, we waste around one third of all food produced, which equates to a staggering 1.3 billion tonnes. At the same time, one in ten people on the planet go hungry.

“In the field with farmers, at processing plants, and in supermarkets, homes and restaurants – right across that food production, processing and consumption supply chain, we’re wasting 30 percent of food. In Australia, it’s 40 percent,” says Professor Andy Lowe, Director of Food Innovation at the University of Adelaide.

According to some estimates, that equates to more than four million tonnes of waste discarded each year, which costs the Australian economy $20 billion per annum.

“Up to 2.2 million tonnes of food is wasted from the commercial and industrial sectors, resulting in significant waste disposal charges and lost product costs to business,” states the National Food Waste Strategy — a 2017 government report that aims to reduce food waste in Australia by 50 per cent by 2030.

The environmental impact of food waste is considerable too. Some food waste gets composted, but most goes to landfill where it breaks down and releases greenhouse gases like methane and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The report states that: “7.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent will be generated from food waste disposed of in 2014–15 over the life of its decay.”

How to reduce food waste

There are a number of practical strategies businesses can adopt to reduce waste in the food services sector.

“Shorten the links in the supply chain to reduce food waste,” says Lowe. Additionally, buy from markets which are close to the source of production or grow your own where possible.

Poor stock management, storage, and handling practices are drivers of food waste in the hospitality sector, as highlighted in the National Food Waste Strategy. Developing limited menus with fewer options is one way to reduce waste, says Assistant Professor in International Studies at the University of Canberra, Bethaney Turner,

“Being aware of what you’ve got, keeping it visible and rotating stock are keys ways in which we can…reduce waste.”

Another option is to reduce serving sizes. Nearly 30 percent of Australians leave food on their plate when they dine out.

“It’s okay to have extravagant meals every now and then but we have to think carefully about not over-ordering or over-buying,” says Turner.

Professor Lowe would like to see the revival of ‘doggie bags’, where diners take home leftovers from a restaurant. “Allowing customers to take home food that the seller considers safe for consumption…[is] a significant step to help reduce food waste,” he says.

Some eateries address health concerns by packaging leftovers with a sticker providing information about food safety guidelines.

Solving a global problem

Food rescue charities such as FoodBank and OzHarvest collect surplus food from businesses and events and redistributes it to people in need.

Reducing food waste is achievable but requires systematic change, says Turner. “We need structures that help us repurpose leftover food. We need good composting structures and organic waste disposal, and we need people to think carefully about how much they’re buying.”

The good news is that individuals, small businesses, and larger organisations can make small changes to their behaviour to be part of the solution to this global problem.

Tools to Help Your Business get Organised Every Day

Now more than ever, running a business is a 24/7 commitment. On any given day, you have staff to manage, meetings to schedule, marketing objectives to meet and customers to keep happy.

There are plenty of apps and tools on the market to help you manage, schedule, appoint tasks and arrive on time. These include “email slayers”, spending trackers, flight planners and even an app to help find a font you like. Here are 10 little-to-no-cost wonders that will help you run your business without a hitch.

IFTT (If This, Then That): IFTT is a series of applets that perform a specific task. These applets connect features across multiple platforms to do things like get a notification if it’s going to rain tomorrow, or automatically save new Gmail attachments to your Google Drive.

Cost: Free

TinyScan: This handy app turns your phone into a pocket scanner that can scan in documents, receipts, or even multiple files in seconds. TinyScan uses your smartphone camera to take a photo of any A4 document (in colour or black and white), all while on the go. It stores your virtual copy ready to share via email or a cloud-based platform.

Cost: Free limited use version. Full version: A$7.99 or US$5.99.

Hopper: Business travel can sometimes come up last-minute, but if you know the dates of when you want to fly, and your destination, Hopper alerts you on when to book to get the cheapest airfares. Add multiple trips to your “watchlist” and enable notifications to get alerts that let you know the best time to buy. Once you’re ready to purchase, Hopper lets you book directly from the app.

Cost: Free.

Unroll me: If you’ve subscribed to work-related email newsletters (and maybe some personal ones as well), it’s probably causing your inbox to burst at the seams. Rather than trying to wade through your inbox and unsubscribe one by one manually, Unroll.me sends you a once-daily summary of all of them and lets you quickly unsubscribe to the ones you no longer want.

Cost: Free.

What The Font: If you’ve seen a font on a logo you like the look of, this tool can help. Simply upload the logo, check the letter mapping and you’ll be given a list of possible font matches.

Cost: Free. Payment required for the font (should you wish to purchase).

online_tools_social_media_presence

 

Down For Everyone or Just Me: This handy tool allows you to enter a website URL to figure out if it’s down for everyone, or if it’s a problem on your end. Enter the URL in the search box, click the link, and away you go.

Cost: Free.

Grammarly: As we’re communicating more and more via email, this handy tool skims as you type, highlighting any spelling mistakes or grammatical errors and suggestions on how to correct them.

Cost: Free. Premium tier starts at A$39.30 or US$29.95 per month.

Postfity: When it’s all hands on deck in your business, it’s hard to schedule time to update your online social presence as well. This is where Postify can help. It lets you update Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google Plus, connecting up to five unique accounts. You can send immediately, as well as schedule updates.

Cost: Free. Basic tier pricing starts at $A6.55 or US$5 per month.

MyWeeklyBudget: With a streamlined and simple-to-use interface for tracking your spending, this app allows you to enter the item and amount after each purchase. It’s a good alternative to a spreadsheet or logging into an app once a month to see if you’ve stuck to your budget.

Cost: A$1.49 or US 99c.

BONUS: As our digital lives become increasingly intertwined with our physical ones, developers have been looking for ways for family members to have access to our digital files after we die. Dead Man’s Switch is a service that lets you leave some important info (usernames, passwords, etc) for your loved ones. It lets you craft a secure email to be sent out if you don’t respond to the service’s periodic emails checking in with you.

Cost: Free. Premium tier: A$26.25 or US$20/lifetime.

Now with these business helpers, you’ve got a few ways to make your worklife a little easier to navigate.

Related Article:

Marketing Your Business in the Digital Age

About the Author

Angela Allan is a journalist, copywriter, social media manager, and content strategist. A former music writer for Rolling Stone, FHM and Australian Penthouse, Angela started her own online publication, Soot Magazine, in 2012. She went on to become managing editor of Australia’s first brand-led newsroom at CHE Proximity. In 2016, she led the digital video campaign for Crown-owned brand, San Antone by Bludso’s BBQ. Currently, she is the digital copywriter for Melbourne startup Foxley

How 457 Visa Axing will Impact the Hospitality Industry

The 457 visa is no more. The Federal Government has brought the axe down on the controversial work visa for overseas visitors in Australia.

In its place will be a new two-tiered visa program, which will come saddled with higher restrictions and greater skills tests for migrant or travelling workers.

But what does this mean for the hospitality industry?

Of the 97,766 primary 457 visa holders in Australia last year, 15,260 worked in the accommodation and food services sectors alone, which means this news is going to have major ripple effects throughout the industry.

Food and beverage

There is already a shortfall of workers for jobs in the food industry, and that isn’t likely to get better anytime soon.

Industry body Restaurant and Catering Australia predicts that 160,000 jobs may go unfilled by 2020, with Restaurant and Catering SA deputy chief Sally Neville saying this shortfall would need to be met by overseas workers.

“Given we do not have adequate numbers in training, it’s clear that the industry will need to rely more on immigration to fill jobs,” she said.

Neville said that regional areas of Australia were already finding it more difficult to find workers than businesses in the urban regions.

“They just don’t have the steady stream of travellers or uni students to plug the shortfall,” she said.

Accommodation

Despite the accommodation industry’s heavy reliance on workers on a 457 visa, the Australian Hotels Association remains optimistic.

A spokesman said the changes presented an opportunity to leverage a more targeted approach towards getting migrant workers into hotel jobs.

“We will be happy to work with the Federal Government to ensure that their objective of growing local employment is met, while also encouraging growth in the hospitality sector through carefully-targeted temporary skilled worker placements, particularly to support regional Australia,” he said.

457 Visa and how its impacting the hospitality industry

Travel and tourism

Regional tourism operators stand to be the most affected by this proposed change to the visa scheme, with 457 employees filling many roles they struggle to find locals willing to take on.

Tourism Accommodation Australia (TAA) chair Martin Ferguson said they would be pushing the government to ensure training is supplied for locals to fill the roles that could potentially be vacated by those previously on 457 visas.

“Once we have seen the full content of the government’s changes we will be making representations to relevant ministers to ensure that our industry—one of the country’s largest growth industries—receives the support it requires over the next five years,” he said.

“We are also seeking greater investment in training and development of local residents to ensure that we can offer world-class service standards to complement the massive transformation of the industry’s physical product.”
Related Article:

What Customer Experience do you Want to Deliver?

About the Author

Josh Alston is a versatile and experienced journalist, covering rounds for daily, regional and community newspapers that include; news, sport, politics, community issues and much more. In 12 years working as a journalist and editor, Mr Alston has covered major events like Federal elections, budgets, sporting events such as State of Origin and covered the economic and physical growth of Queensland. Today, Mr Alston is the founder of Art of Writing PR, generating topical and engaging copy for his clients to enhance their online presence and build their brands.

Simple Ways to Improve Management in Hospitality

One of a manager’s greatest frustrations in hospitality can be grooming team members to be highly skilled, only to see them walk out the door to use those skills for a competitor.

There are a number of things you can do to prevent these poaching raids, which this article will outline.

Create a culture and involve team members

There is no official blueprint for a successful culture that fits all businesses, but it is important you develop one to foster team harmony.

The biggest players in the hospitality industry have rituals that can help create this culture, including team line-ups, activities and unique tasks like community gardens to work on.

Team is the operative word in creating this culture. Staff members can feel disenfranchised if referred to as “workers” or “employees”. Simple tricks like calling them “team members” and “leaders” can boost morale to no end, and aid in creating a strong team dynamic.

Awards and goals are always handy motivators for team members but aren’t a necessity. Just ensure that achievements and goals are celebrated and incentivized to guarantee there is a positive culture where everyone feels valued for their hard work.

How to ward off poaching raids by your competitors

Retaining staff can be a delicate task for management in hospitality, and it can be easy to become frustrated when employees jump ship to another company.

It is important to recognize that there are several reasons why they may be leaving, and most centre around job satisfaction.

One of the most critical roles of a manager is to recognize the signs of a team member becoming disenfranchised and to act. This is vital because if a team member is unhappy, they are targets for poaching.

Keep promises to a bare minimum, because if something goes wrong and they don’t transpire, this can trigger staff restlessness as well.

It is also worth noting that sometimes you do have to let staff go because trying to entice them to stay with rewards can be detrimental to the morale of other staff members; it’s a real juggling act.

Right off the bat, look for signs of job hoppers in the recruitment process. If they don’t stay in a job for longer than 12 months to 2 years, there is every chance they’ll depart early when working for you as well.

Simple ways to improve hospitality

 

Embrace the future and be flexible

There can be a misconception that the hospitality industry cannot accommodate flexibility, like working from home, part-time arrangements or job sharing.

This mindset has to be pushed aside because the modern world is embracing this flexibility more and more.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics data shows that one in three Australians are regularly working from home, and 32 per cent of Aussie workers are employed part-time.

This is important to recognize, especially as 55 per cent of people polled in a recent survey listed workplace flexibility as one of the most important factors when looking for a job.

By being flexible, and open to non-traditional rostering, you can help meet the changing needs of the modern workforce. Exploring opportunities for people on the administration side being able to do some of their work from home can also open up benefits.

There are key attractions for millennials, who now make up half of the workforce and will make up 75 per cent by 2030.

By opening the door to non-traditional rostering, you can help capture the best talent from this generation.

Related Article:

What Customer Experience do you Want to Deliver?

About the Author

Josh Alston

A former news hound, editor and roaming reporter for News Corp Australia for 12 years, Josh is now a freelance copywriter covering politics, innovation, technology, health, science and financial services, among other topics.