Tag Archives: small business

Bar Boosters: Marketing Strategies for SMBs

All business owners are always looking to boost sales, but with a lack of time under their belt, and ever-evolving marketing tactics, knowing how to do so can become a blur.

Here are some pointers to help you pinpoint a few basic steps towards getting on the right track…

Assess the data through your POS

Whether you’re a retailer or a restaurateur, a good point of sale (POS) marketing strategy can increase sales and drive the bottom line.

Providing in-depth analytics and business insights, POS marketing requires not only the ability to promote a product to customers, but also to make a compelling value proposition to retailers.

But, to get the maximum out of your POS, you can also utilise built-in analytics systems to assess what’s working and what isn’t.

Most POS systems offer analytics with a real-time dashboard so you can consume highly intuitive data around sales, inventory, staff and more. One of the great POS analytics platforms is Lightspeed, whose system covers everything from inventory management to promotional data.

Signage is your signal

In collaboration with POS analytics, it’s important to have great signage in and around your premise. A report from POPAI Australia & New Zealand has a number of key findings after a clinical trial was conducted in the UK and Ireland.

Some of the major details argued that female shoppers who were in-store for 60 or more minutes, bought more from POS displays than male shoppers. Men, on the other, hand were more susceptible to in-store promotions.

Floor graphics and walkaround displays worked best for food and snack purchases, whilst premium displays were the most effective for when people made a trip to food and beverage retailers in a non-premeditated manner.

Taking advantage of the Aussie sports scene

In Australia, there is arguably no bigger sport than AFL.

According to Roy Morgan, 8.4 million Australians tuned in to the 2017 Grand Final, whilst another 1.8 million watched some of the highlights. A 2015 study from Australian universities reveals that 87 percent of alcohol advertising during the day is done during sports broadcasts.

By utilising sports marketing ideas for your bar or restaurant, you can gain the attention of sports-goers who are looking for a hotspot that caters to their interests. Consider including campaigns to support local teams through sponsored evenings, social media promotions, and blog posts on your website. Additionally, running your own tipping competitions, sports-dedicated nights and viewings can help leverage new customers at your door.

If that doesn’t fly, there’s always the favourite marketing ploy of naming drinks after athletes, and hosting replays of classic games during slow periods doesn’t hurt either.

It’s important to know that the only way to publicise your event however, is through the implementation of a bonafide social media strategy.

Develop a social media strategy

A recent study from Maru/Matchbox shows that 69 percent of millennials photograph their food and post it to social media before eating.

In light of this, developing a social media strategy to take advantage of this trend is one of the greatest values to your business.

A five-point strategy is one of the best methods to employ, according to Cambridgeshire Chambers of Commerce. Below is one model to consider:

  • Instagram: Some of the elementary advice is to not post pictures that look like ads, and do not rely on paid Instagram posts. It is important to set up a posting schedule by analysing market data and analytics, whilst employing basic media techniques such as “the rule of thirds” and “regramming”. One of the biggest winners is having a human touch; sharing photos and videos of your followers and their friends is a big win.
  • Facebook: One of the best ways to nail your marketing on this platform is to set up an event and encourage people to share by running a promotion (you do need a reasonable following to achieve this). Other methods of increasing views are to undertake the “three for three” trick. Spend three minutes commenting or liking posts of three other major pages around your area and watch the extra likes come in.
  • Twitter and Snapchat: Twitter is an easy way to grow but requires consistency and a lot of hashtags. On the other side of the coin, Snapchat is a great way to boost visual interaction through using a Geofilter. This tool gives you the ability to set a local tagline or graphic on your business posts that others can access and utilise.

Blogging and SEO: According to HubSpot, blogging is one of the best and most underutilised tools for small businesses. The research notes: “B2B companies that blogged 11 or more times per month had almost three times more traffic than those blogging zero to one times per month.” Blogging is a two-edged sword, as search engines use algorithms based on keywords to serve up relevant content to their users. Input the right words into your blog and you’ll have a higher chance of climbing search results and rankings.

With these tips in mind, consistency is the key for any content creation or content marketing strategy. Like all businesses, creating a successful brand requires time, effort and regular marketing efforts that are reviewed, assessed and updated.

By Timothy Buttery 

Digital Marketing Tips for your Business

Digital Marketing plays a key role in growing businesses of all shapes and sizes, all around the world. In this highly competitive landscape, it has never been more important to keep up to date with the latest changes and advancements in digital marketing.

In this Infographic, we show the importance of digital marketing to businesses today and the digital marketing techniques that marketers find most effective.

Digital_marketing_tips_Business

Tackling the Food Crisis in Australia

By Nicola Heath

The statistics around food waste are startling. Globally, we waste around one third of all food produced, which equates to a staggering 1.3 billion tonnes. At the same time, one in ten people on the planet go hungry.

“In the field with farmers, at processing plants, and in supermarkets, homes and restaurants – right across that food production, processing and consumption supply chain, we’re wasting 30 percent of food. In Australia, it’s 40 percent,” says Professor Andy Lowe, Director of Food Innovation at the University of Adelaide.

According to some estimates, that equates to more than four million tonnes of waste discarded each year, which costs the Australian economy $20 billion per annum.

“Up to 2.2 million tonnes of food is wasted from the commercial and industrial sectors, resulting in significant waste disposal charges and lost product costs to business,” states the National Food Waste Strategy — a 2017 government report that aims to reduce food waste in Australia by 50 per cent by 2030.

The environmental impact of food waste is considerable too. Some food waste gets composted, but most goes to landfill where it breaks down and releases greenhouse gases like methane and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The report states that: “7.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent will be generated from food waste disposed of in 2014–15 over the life of its decay.”

How to reduce food waste

There are a number of practical strategies businesses can adopt to reduce waste in the food services sector.

“Shorten the links in the supply chain to reduce food waste,” says Lowe. Additionally, buy from markets which are close to the source of production or grow your own where possible.

Poor stock management, storage, and handling practices are drivers of food waste in the hospitality sector, as highlighted in the National Food Waste Strategy. Developing limited menus with fewer options is one way to reduce waste, says Assistant Professor in International Studies at the University of Canberra, Bethaney Turner,

“Being aware of what you’ve got, keeping it visible and rotating stock are keys ways in which we can…reduce waste.”

Another option is to reduce serving sizes. Nearly 30 percent of Australians leave food on their plate when they dine out.

“It’s okay to have extravagant meals every now and then but we have to think carefully about not over-ordering or over-buying,” says Turner.

Professor Lowe would like to see the revival of ‘doggie bags’, where diners take home leftovers from a restaurant. “Allowing customers to take home food that the seller considers safe for consumption…[is] a significant step to help reduce food waste,” he says.

Some eateries address health concerns by packaging leftovers with a sticker providing information about food safety guidelines.

Solving a global problem

Food rescue charities such as FoodBank and OzHarvest collect surplus food from businesses and events and redistributes it to people in need.

Reducing food waste is achievable but requires systematic change, says Turner. “We need structures that help us repurpose leftover food. We need good composting structures and organic waste disposal, and we need people to think carefully about how much they’re buying.”

The good news is that individuals, small businesses, and larger organisations can make small changes to their behaviour to be part of the solution to this global problem.

Break Through the Red Tape

The first rule of food production and service is safety.

It is an issue that is treated seriously and severely in Australia, with recalls, fines and even heavier penalties handed out when the standards are breached.

This can be a lot to take on board for businesses, with governing bodies existing at all three tiers of government.

This article aims to cut through the red tape so you can ensure you are properly protected.

Food safety standards in Australia

Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) is the governing body for food and beverage safety guidelines in our country.

FSANZ covers food safety programs, practices and general requirements, premises and equipment, and programs for food service to vulnerable persons.

The guidelines for the ‘Food Safety Practices and General Requirements’ and ‘Food Premises and Equipment’ sections are mandatory for all food businesses. These guidelines can all be read in the Safe Food Australia document, which is currently under review.

It is also important to note that charity and community groups, temporary events and home-based businesses are exempt from some of these guidelines, so it’s important for them to check with their local enforcement agency before serving customers.

But while this is the blanket body across the nation, it is important to note that states and territories have their own governing bodies and guidelines as well.

Keep up to date what with the legalities in running a hospitality business

 

How it varies from state to state

ACT

Canberra is subject to the federal FSANZ guidelines.

New South Wales

There are two acts of legislation to consider here, the Food Act 2003 (NSW) and Food Regulation 2015.

The Food Act 2003 (NSW) enforces FSANZ guidelines and then designs, and monitors food safety schemes under the Food Regulation 2015 for the higher risk industries.

Northern Territory

Like the ACT, the NT operates under FSANZ guidelines.

Queensland

Safe Food Queensland manages operational aspects, and it is important to familiarise yourself with the Food Act 2006, the Food Regulation 2006, the Food Production (Safety) Act 2000 and the Food Production (Safety) Regulation 2014. Also check with local governments, which may have their own food safety regulations.

South Australia

The Food Safety and Nutrition Branch (FSNB) of South Australia Health is the governing body for guidelines here. It operates under two acts of legislation: the Food Act 2001 (SA) and the Food Regulations 2002, as well as FSANZ. FSNB works in tandem with other government agencies and local governments to ensure maximum safety.

Tasmania

The guidelines on the Apple Isle are perhaps the most stringent in the country, with a clear mandate to not only ensure safety but protect the state’s reputation. A raft of legislation needs to be considered here, including; The Primary Produce Safety Act 2011, Primary Produce Safety (Egg) Regulations 2014, and Primary Produce Safety (Meat and Poultry) Regulations 2014. Guidelines for dairy, seafood, and seed sprouts also need to be recognised.

Victoria

The Food Act 1984 provides the regulatory framework in Victoria. Health Victoria works with Federal and local governments to ensure consistency across the board.

Western Australia

Out west, the State Government boasts that they have the most comprehensive food safety legislation in the country, under the Food Act 2008. It covers 19 different issues for consumers and many, many topics for businesses covered under seven banners. Heavy reading, but as close to watertight as you can get in this country.

Where businesses have fallen afoul of the guidelines

The legislated rules for food safety are more than just guidelines—they carry heavy penalties if not followed.

Brisbane restaurant West End Garden was slugged with a $37,500 fine in August last year for multiple breaches.

Produce is also vulnerable, with 80 cases of salmonella in 2016 linked to the consumption of rockmelons.

There were also fears of a national shortage of garlic bread early this year after a recall of 11 of George Weston Foods products was issued.

In addition to these instances, bread rolls and mango drinks have also been recalled from supermarket shelves in recent years.

FSANZ lists the problems that can cause contamination as microbial contamination, labeling errors, foreign matter, chemical or other contaminants, undeclared allergens, biotoxins and other faults.

It definitely pays to be vigilant about food safety legislation.

About the Author

Josh Alston is a journalist, editor and copywriter who has worked for several daily, community and regional newspapers across the Queensland seaboard for 12 years. In this time he has covered news, sport and community issues and has been published in major daily newspapers and nationally online for breaking news. Josh presently works as a freelance reporter writing for clients including the Victorian Government, AGL Energy and a host of others.

 

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